Les fabuleux destins

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The only page of this blog not dealing with Belgian labour law but with another passion of mine: enjoying the backcountry and – in a lesser extend – the underwater world.

All solo and unguided travelling & backpacking. A selection (first diving, then backpacking destinations):

Diving

MALDIVES

INDONESIA (Komodo & Tulamben wreck)

Film footage diving @ Komodo en Tulamben wreck (length 35 minutes).

Backpacking & cross country skying

ICELAND

Click here for a dedicated page regarding backpacking in Iceland

SAREK, Europe’s last mountain wilderness

Click here for a dedicated page regarding backpacking in Sarek

KEBNEKAISE & NARVIKFJELLENE (Laponia), winter 2015

CAIRNGORMS (4 days, spring Scotland):

Itinerary 2014-trip (spring): Blair Atholl > Tarf hotel bothy > Feshie bothy > Corrour bothy > Chalamain Gap (partially cross country, small sections of talus)
photos
Itinerary 2013-trip (autumn): Glenmore > River Nethy > Loch Avon > Loch Etchachan > Ben Macdui > Hutchinson Memorial Hut > Derry Lodge > Devil’s Point > Corrour bothy > Lairig Ghru > Loch an Eilin > Aviemore (photos)
Recommended guidebook: none necessary – bothy information can be found here . Don’t know what a bothy is? Click here. Do not solely rely on bothys as some are very popular (e.g. Corrour bothy). Always bring your own shelter (preferably a tent for this region).
Recommended maps (topo & gps base map):

  • Cairngorms & Lochnagar (Harvey maps – ISBN 978-185137453-3)
  • For the part south of Tarf hotel Boty: Landranger map n°43 (Ordnance Survey – ISBN 978-0-319-23119-7)
  • Garmin gps base map: openmtbmap.org   (ideally supplemented with your own gpx-tracks for the cross country sections – just in case the landscape fogs up)

Beste season: first two weeks of May (May is statistically one of the driest month in Scotland, daylight hours are long and midges normally begin to hatch during the second part of May/start of June). Avoid school holidays and bank holiday weekends. Large snow fields may persist on the Cairngorm plateaus well into May.
Remember this is Scotland: even in May, one can – exceptionally – see all four seasons in one day.
Beware of deer stalking when travelling during late summer or autumn.
Interesting to note: the eastern highlands receive less rainfall than the western highlands, resulting in significantly less boggy ground (especially of importance when going off trail).

Public transportation to trailheads:

  • Blair Atholl is a train station on the Highland Main Line. Trains operated by Scotrail.
  • Chalamain Gap is an easy +/- 30 min walk to/from the Cairngorms – Aviemore road: one can flag down Stagecoach bus n°31 anywhere along the road (there are no designated bus stops along the upper part of the road), calling at Aviemore train station  (sometimes called ‘Aviemore Interchange North’ on the Stagecoach timetable). This station is also on the Highland Main Line.

Remarks: Edinburgh will often be the most convenient gateway city. In Edinburgh, I always stay at the no frills though modern Tune Hotel: accross Haymarket train station (an important station with direct trains to most of the Highland Main Line stations. Haymarket is also a stop along the Edinburgh airport bus line and the – future – tram between Edinburgh city center and the airport).
The hotel offers a left luggage facility for  2£/day, providing a future night is booked.

Last update: December 2015

CAPE WRATH TRAIL: section Glenfinnan -> Strathcarron (5 days, spring, Scotland): 

Itinerary: Glennfinnan > Sourlies bothy > Barisdale > Shiel Bridge > Strathcarron (partially cross country which is often (very) boggy)
photos
Recommended guidebook: Cicerone’s Cape Wrath Trail, written by Iain Harper (ISBN 978-1-85284-667-1). Iaian is very accessible through this forum (unless, of course, he is of backpacking :-))
Recommended maps (topo & gps base map):

  • Landranger maps n°25, n°33, n°40 (Ordnance Survey)
  • Garmin gps base map: openmbtmap.org  (supplemented with gpx-tracks as some sections are off trail and/or not listed on the Openmbtmaps. Gpx-files for the entire Cape Wrath Trail can be found here)

Beste season: first two weeks of May (May is statistically one of the driest month in Scotland, daylight hours are long and midges normally begin to hatch late May/start of June).
Remember this is Scotland: even in May, one can – exceptionally – see all four seasons in one day.  Expect – and be prepared for – rain (potentially lots of it).
Also beware of deer stalking when travelling during late summer or autumn (read: in general not a recommended season for the Cape Wrath Trail as it involves significant sections of off trail walking).

Public transportation to trailheads:

  • Glennfinnan is a train station on the West Higland Line (direct trains from Glasgow Queen Street station, offering plenty of (very) scenic views). Glasgow Queen street sees plenty of train to/from Edinburgh. Trains operated by Scotrail.
  • Strathcarron also has a train station, on the Kyle of Lochalsh Line. Change at Inverness to get to Edinburgh or Glasgow, riding along the Highland Main Line. Trains operated by Scotrail.

Remarks:

  • Edinburgh will often be the most convenient gateway city. See the Cairngorms section for a hotel tip.
  • I only walked a section of the Cape Wrath Trail, which is more than 300 km/200 miles in total. A well written trip report of the whole route can be found here.
  • Expect (very) boggy terain, especially when travelling off trail. Also expect – exceptionally difficult – river fording after extended periods of rain.
  • The Cape Wrath Trail is not signposted nor is it an official trail/route, contrary to the – well developped – West Highland Way.

Last update: May 2014

RONDANE (4 days, spring, Norway)

Itinerary: Mysuseter > Rondvassbu hutDørålseter hut > Grimsdals hutHageseter (Photos)
Recommended guidebook: a guidebook is not necessary.  An overview of huts and (winter)routes can be found on the ut.no website (click on the map section and zoom onto Rondane).
Recommended maps (topo & gps base map):

  • Nordeca map n°2716 ‘Rondane’ (scale 1/100 000. Google around to find it). Winter routes are indicated with bleu dots. Summer routes might not be safe (e.g. the summer route between Grimsdals hut and Hageseter – which I ignorantly took – was clearly exposed to avalanche prone snow pack.
  • Garmin gps base map: openmtbmap.org   (supplemented with your own gpx-tracks when travelling outside Easter season (winter routes are not indicated on the Openmtbmaps and are only guaranteed to be waymarked on the ground during Easter holiday. And the weather can turn nasty (read: low visibility)) .
  • A simple overview maps of winter route in southern and central Norway can be found here. This map also give a rough estimate of the distances between huts/trailheads.

Beste season: If – like me – you don’t like crowds, are perpared – and skilled – to find your own winter route and if you’re willing to fire up the stove & cook food yourself: the fourth and third week before Easter. Daylight hours then start to lengthen and chances of good weather improve signifianctly.  The last two week before Easter, the Dørålseter and Grimsdals huts switch to full service modus and winter routes will be waymarked, attracting lots of visitors. Not my cup of tea.
(btw: the popular Rondvassbu hut is already in full service mode from the beginning of March)
Outside full service seasons, all mentioned huts are so called ‘self service’ huts (see further). Note though that virtually all Rondane huts are completely closed from the 1th of May until 10 June, thus not even accessible with a DNT-key (read: discouraging visiting Rondane to prevent disturbing deer calving). The ut.no website provides the exact opening times for every hut.
Rondane is situated in a rain shadow. The weather in Rondane is often significantly better than e.g. Jotunheimen or Dovrefjell. But it still can get pretty nasty, as you can witness in this footage (featuring yours truly):

Public transportation to trailheads:

  • To Mysuseter: there are daily direct trains from Gardermoen Airport and Oslo Central Station to the town of Otta, situated on the Oslo-Trondheim railway line. Tickets can be bought online on the website of the Norwegian railway company. The advance ‘minipris’ fares – if still available – are the cheapest, although not changeable nor refundable.
    From Otta, a local taxi can be taken to Mysuseter (metered, approximatly 340 NOK in 2014, +/- 12 kilometer). If you don’t find taxis waiting outside the train station, simply ask at the train station to call one (the train station is staffed).
  • From  Hageseter to the nearest train station requires walking/hitchhiking along the E70 road for a couple of kilometers (according to my map, there should also be a trail parallel the E70).  Hjerkinn is on the Oslo-Trondheim railway line and is served daily by direct trains to Gardermoen airport and Oslo Central Station.
    Hjerkinn station has a spacious heated waiting area but is not staffed (note: signboards in the waiting area clearly instruct that it is not allowed to spend the night there – not sure if this is checked (… in winter)).
    Again, booking an advance ‘minipris’ ticket – only available online and in limited amounts – will be signifiantly cheaper than purchasing full fare ticket on the spot. If you don’t have a ticket, a full fare ticket can be purchased from the train conductor upon boarding the train, cash or with credit card.
    Also, for some train services, Hjerkinn is a request stop: these train will slow down upon arriving at Hjerkinn. The train driver will hereby only stop if someone is outside, on the train platform (and preferably give some sort of hand sign to the train driver). The timetable indicates whether Hjerkinn is a request stop for a specific train service or not.

Remarks:

  • Norway’s unique ‘self service’ huts. Most Norwegian huts remain open the entire year (The Rondane region is an important exceptions: most huts are completely closed from 1/5 till 10/6 in order not to disturb deer calving. Even a DNT-key will not work during this time). When not staffed, they become ‘self service’ huts. In self service modus, most DNT huts can only be accessed using a universal key from the Norwegian Trekking Association (*), and are normally equipped  with a fully functioning & equiped kitchen, plenty of fire wood  AND are most often stocked with lots of food. They are most often very comfortable, with cushioned seatings, duvets and fire stoves (tip: bring fire starters, and reserve (the wood can sometimes be moist). Even in self service modus, one can therefore (theoretically) hike with solely a day pack (sleeping bag or sleeping liner is however mandatory) . You pay for you lodging and food by cash or via credit card (**). An honesty system thus. Do NOT abuse it.
    As small number of huts can be accessed without a key and/or not do not have food provisions.
    Check ut.no for precise details about every hut you plan to visit.
  • Hageseter hut – which is not a DNT hut – is only open during Easter holiday (remember however, Hjerkinn train station is close by: you might consider skipping Hageseter).
  • Camping is obviously also an option, providing one is proficient with winter camping (not my preference though during winter as I normally travel solo: I am not looking forward spending a long day in a little tent, sitting out a winter storm).
  • This itinerary saw plenty of ups & downs and many exposed sections with snow (partially) blown away. In short: not ideal for pulkas. Bring a backpack (also far more convenient when using public transportation…)
  • Gardermoen Airport actually lies between Otta and Oslo, thus along the Oslo-Trondheim railway line. So normally no need to transit first to Oslo city center upon arriving at Gardermoen Airport. Instead of transiting to Oslo, my recommendation is to spend your overnight stop going/coming back from the trailhead at one of the airport hotels . Check booking.com. The hotel shuttle buses are not free though (70 krones one way!). An alternative is the night train service. But the travel time to Kongsvold or Oppdal is in my opinion to short for a good night sleep.
    Be reminded that Oslo has two other airports, mostly used by no-frill airlines such as Ryanair (Torp Airport and Rygge Airport). If you want to maximise your holiday allowance (and minimise travel stress), pick an airliner flying on Gardermoen as the other airports imply transiting to/from Oslo city center – when using public transportation – before travelling further to/from the trailhead.

(*) In order to get a key, one must be a member of one of the Nordic mountain association (Norway, Sweden, Finland or Iceland) and pay a one off deposit of 100 NOK.  Becoming a member of most of these assiciations and getting the key can be done from your own couch (and with a credit card): after becoming a member simply email DNT Norway with your request to get a key. You’ll have to provide your credit card details via email, they’ll charge the deposit and send you the key via snail mail. As long a you don’t request your deposit back, you can keep the key for as long as you want.
(**) When in ‘self service’ modus, every hut is equipped with plenty of payment forms. First, fill in the log book (hereby prodiving yourself with a register number, which you’ll need for the payment form). Than fill up the payment form (‘betalingsfullmakt’) and put it in the bin provided for. If you pay by credit card, you just fill in your credit card details on this form and you’r done. One can also slip cash in the bin, although that would be my second choice (as, obviously, change money is not available)

Last update: August 2014

DOVREFJELL (4 days, spring, Norway)

Itinerary: Blokhus > Dindals hut > Loennechenbau hut > Amotsdals hut > Reinheim Hut > Kongsvold (Photos )
Recommended guidebook: a guidebook is not necessary.  An overview of huts and (winter)routes can be found on the ut.no website (click on the map section and zoom onto Dovrjefjell).
Recommended maps (topo & gps base map):

  • Nordeca map n°2710 ‘Dovrefjell’ (scale 1/100 000. Google around to find it). Winter routes are indicated with bleu dots. Summer routes might not be safe.
  • Garmin gps base map: openmtbmap.org  (supplemented with your own gpx-tracks when travelling outside Easter season (winter routes are not indicated on the Openmtbmaps and are only guaranteed to be waymarked on the ground during Easter holiday. And the weather can turn nasty (read: low visibility)) .
  • A simple overview maps of winter route in southern and central Norway can be found here. This map also give a rough estimate of the distances between huts/trailheads.

Beste season: any time around Easter: Daylight hours then start to lengthen and chances of good weather improve signifianctly.  The winter routes are normally guaranteed to be waymarked during Norwegian Easter holiday (Palm Sunday > Easter Monday), making route finding significantly easier. Waymarking is done through the use of bamboo sticks, placed +/- every 30 meter.
Norwegian Easter holiday will attract a bit more visitors, but it won’t feel crowded (as can be the case in e.g. Rondane or Jotunheimen).

Public transportation to trailheads:

  • To Blokhus: there are daily direct trains from Gardermoen Airport and Oslo Central Station to the town of Oppdal, situated on the Oslo-Trondheim railway line. Tickets can be bought online on the website of the Norwegian railway company. The advance ‘minipris’ fares – if still available – are the cheapest, although not changeable nor refundable.
    From Oppdal, take the connecting bus with Kristiansund as final destination, ask the bus driver to drop you of at the road junction which leads to Blokhus/Dinsdalhytte. The bus ride will take about 15 minutes. Note that not all train arrivals will be met by a bus service to Kristiansund (read: check the timetables of Norwegian Rail, which will also indicate whether this connecting bus service will be provided).
    From the road junction, you’ll have to walk half an hour/one hour to reach blokhus, depending on your walking speed. You might try to hitchhike. From Blokhus, it is normally possible step into your skis and make your way to Dindals hut.
  • From Kongsvold: Kongsvold has a train station, situated on the Oslo-Trondheim railway line and is served daily by direct trains to Gardermoen airport and Oslo Central Station.
    Kongsvold has a small, heated waiting area but is not staffed. If you’r way ahead of schedule, the Kongvold hotel provides a perfect stop for a drink and/or snack. The train station is five minutes away from the hotel.
    Again, booking an advance ‘minipris’ ticket – only available online and in limited amounts – will be signifiantly cheaper than purchasing full fare ticket on the spot. If you don’t have a ticket, a full fare ticket can be purchased from the train conductor upon boarding the train, cash or with credit card.
    Also, for some train services, Kongsvold is a request stop: these train will slow down upon arriving at Kongsvold. The train driver will hereby only stop if someone is outside, on the train platform (and preferably give some sort of hand sign to the train driver). The timetable indicates whether Kongsvold is a request stop for a specific train service or not.

Remarks:

  • See higher for information concerning Norway’s unique hut system.
    Note that the Loennechenbau hut does NOT have food provisions (but firewood and a fully functioning kitchen is provided). It is also a tiny hut with only two beds + 1 spare mattress (read: bring your own sleeping bag & sleeping pad, in case the hut is full upon arriving)
  • Kongsfold has a hotel (the place only consists of a couple of buildings and a train station)
  • Dovrefjell is a superb region but does see foul weather. Built in some redundancy (read: spare day).
  • Camping is obviously also an option, providing one is proficient with winter camping (not my preference though during winter as I normally travel solo: I am not looking forward spending a day in a little tent, sitting out a winter storm). The wind in Dovrefjell can be ferocious
  • This itinerary was much easier than Rondane: only one noteworthy climb: from Amotsdals hut to Reinheim hut. I also encountered significantly less patches where snow was blown away.
  • If you have spare time, the weather is good AND the avalanche risk is low, you might consider climbing the Snohetta mountain, basically a side trip between Amotsdals hut and Reinheim hut. It’s a popular climb from Reinheim hut.
  • Gardermoen Airport actually lies between Oppdal & Kongsvold, and Oslo, thus along the Oslo-Trondheim railway line. So normally no need to transit first to Oslo city center upon arriving at Gardermoen Airport. Instead of transiting to Oslo, my recommendation is to spend your overnight stop going and/or coming back from the trailhead at one of the airport hotels. Check booking.com. The hotel shuttle buses are not free though (70 krones one way!). An alternative is the night train service. But the travel time to Kongsvold or Oppdal is in my opinion to short for a good night sleep.
    Be reminded that Oslo has two other airports, mostly used by no-frill airlines such as Ryanair (Torp Airport and Rygge Airport). If you want to maximise your holiday allowance (and minimise travel stress), pick an airliner flying on Gardermoen as the other airports imply transiting to/from Oslo city center – when using public transportation – before travelling further to/from the trailhead.

Last update: August 2014

ESCAPARDENNE EISLECK TRAIL (5 days, winter, Belgian Ardennes):

Itinerary
: Kautenbach> Clervaux > Asselbornmillen > Houffalize > Nadrin > La-Rouche-en-Ardenne (the trail is very well waymarked) (Photos)

Recommended guidebooks and maps: click here. A map isn’t really necessary as the trail is very well waymarked. The official guidebook is interesting though, providing lots of (historic) information and maps.

Beste season: End of April, May, June (dries months, long daylight hours, summer holiday has not yet started and Spring all around). Avoid October, November and December due to hunting season (in Wallonie, whole sections of the trail may then be legally closed off by hunters 😦 )
The official website of the Escapardenne Eisleck Trail normally provides updated information.

Public transportation to trailheads (from Belgium):

  • To Kautenbach: I drove to the Rivage train station (close by the city of Liege), providing direct train services to Kautenbach (Liege-Luxemburg line). Plenty and free car parking space at Rivage. I felt little risk leaving my car at Rivage. Tickets can be booked online, on the webiste of the Belgian railways or on site using the ticketing machine (credit cards accepted). There will be no price difference. Unless the ticketing is broken, puchasing a ticket directly from the train conductor will cost you € 3 extra (give some sort of signal upon boarding the train).
  • From La-Roche-en-Ardenne: One can take a local bus to Marche-en-Famenne or Melreux train station, situated along the  (timetables can be found on the Walloon public bus company – only French though, or the Belgian railways). Both have a train services bag to Rivage. Same options for purchasing a train ticket as in Rivage.

Remarks:

  • Officially, wild camping is not allowed in Belgium or Luxemburg (but some manage to do it without problems. Discretion is paramount). As I walked this trail in February, I opted to stay in hotels (I used booking.com). This trail is perfectly designed for hotel based backpacking, allowing to thru hike it with a small day pack.
  • I did the trail in February and had mixed feelings about it. I think spring would be a much more enjoyable time.
  • More than 50% of the trail follows non surfaced paths, which is IMHO unique in the Belgian ardennes for a trail of this length. Definitely not a wilderness walk (non of that in the low countries…)

Last update: May 2014

NEPAL EVEREST REGION: 

Itinerary 2013 trip (december): Lukla Airport > Namche Bazar > Mong > Upper Pangboche > Chuckung > Dzonghlah > Cho La pass > Gokyo > Namche Bazar > Lukla Airport. (Photos)
Itinerary 2011 trip (April):
Lukla Airport > Namche Bazar > Tenboche > Upper Pangboche > Chuckung > Kongma La > Lobuche > Kala Patar > Junbesi > Deorali > bus > Kathmandu (photos day 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15)
Recommended guidebook:  one guidebook rules: Trekking in the Everest region by Jamie McGuinness. Published by Trialblazer (ISBN: 978-1-873756-99-7). Do not leave without it!
Recommended maps (topo & gps base map):

  • A quality map is not necessary. The maps provided in the Trialblazer guidebook is sufficient.
  • Plenty of gpx-tracks on wikiloc.com
  • A detailed garmin gps base map is not necessary if your gpx-files are ok. NepalTOPO gets good points though.

Beste season: weather wise, October and 1st half of November are the best: monsoon clouds & rain are – normally – gone and nighttime temperatures are manageable. BUT the tea houses (*) will be bursting with trekkers, trails will be VERY crowded and getting flights in/out can be difficult (and will become a nightmare if outbound flights are cancelled for one or more days due to bad weather. Lukla airport operates under visual rules). I took a picture of the montly visitor numbers, enterring the national park. I think that says it all (plenty of confirming info on the web).
March & April will be a little warmer but chances of clouds are higher. But again, plenty of trekkers (to much for my liking).
IMHO the last week of November – first two weeks of December is the best season providing you bring  plenty of warm down clothing and a warm down sleeping bag, as night will be very cold. During the day, expect plenty of sunshine walking as the cold dries out the air  (base layer and wind shirt will often be sufficient. Mornings can still be crispy though). First snow falls around Christmas (but exceptions confirm the rule). Also, week long flight cancellations are virtually non existent during this time of the year (again, plenty of sunshine days). And if cancellations do occur, the backlog is often cleared on the day flights resume due to the significantly lower number of trekkers.

(*) tea houses. So called ‘tea house’ trekking is the standard in the Nepali Everest region. Along most trails, you’ll pass one or more of them every two hours or so. It has become the backbone of the local (tourist) economy in the region. Tea houses offert simple but comfortable catering and lodging. They are very good value for money and allow trekkers to hike (independently) without a camping kit and food. Most tea houses have a comfy communal room, where food & drinks are served. The center piece is most often a stove, fuelled by yak dung (mind you, you’d be luckly if they manage to heat the place up to 15° celcius or so (read: bring plenty of insultation layers). Sleeping accomodation normally consists of tiny rooms consisting of two single bedrooms (do not expect quality sleeping matress). Trekkers are expected to bring their own sleeping bag. I also recommend a pillow cover). Your room will NOT be heated, so it will end up freezing at higher elevations, especially when visiting the region in winter (read: bring a good down sleeping bag).
Do not expect much of the sanitation (mostly) a (simple) squat toilet and virtually no showers).

Reservation are not possible and absolutly not necessary unless you’r so foulish to hike around during peak season. Just show up at the settlement/village and pick the tea house you like most. The unofficial ‘protocol’ is to walk in, look out for staff, ask if a room is available, ask the price – useless as there’s is very little difference,  but one must respect protocol – and agree with the offer. A key will be given and you’r sorted. Payment is usually the day after (read: one bill, together with your food).
Most tea houses have plenty of menus available in the communal room with fixed prices. Haggling is not necessary nor appreciated.
Tipping is not customary in Nepal, except for porters and guides.
Unless you splash out on soda drinks or alchol, you can get trek around the Everest region for +/- 30 USD/day. IMHO a very good deal, taking into account that most of your food AND most building material of you teahouse has been (a) flown in to Lukla and (b) carried further up by porters.

To be clear: as a trekker, there is no reason to carry a camping kit in the Nepali Everest region with you nor is it customary (an exception might be when visiting very remote valleys, such as the upper part of the Bhote valley.)

Last but not least: You will feel the altitude. Bringing plenty of Diamox is therefore highly recommended: it will help significantly (a) to prevent altitude sickness and (b) to recover from mild altitude sickness. Be aware of the side effects: amongst other: it’s a diuretic (drink lots and be conservative with intake before going to bed), tingling lips and finger tops, reduced appetite.
I would daily take two tabs the day before flying into Lukla and stop once I start descending to lower elevations after reaching the highest point of my trek (e.g. Kala Patar or Gokyo Ri). I thus take Diamox to prevent altitude sickness and increase my daily ascent rate.
Diamox can be bought cheaply, plentifull and over the counter in most pharmacies in Kathmandu.

Transportation to Kathmandu

Most tourists will enter Nepal by air, through Kathmandu Airport (KTM). Carriers such as Thai Airlines, Turkish Airlines, Etihad and Qatar Airlines have flights to KTM.

to trailheads: [under construction]

Visa 

Remarks: [under construction] [Purifying water?]

 

Sierra Nevada (California)

 

ZANSKAR (Ladakh, India) 

Photos 2013-trip

Photos 2014-trip

 

GR 20 (Corsica)

Photos
Panoramic photos

Penine Alps (Switserland & Italy)

Photos
Panoramic photos

Haute Randonnée Pyrénéenne (middle section)

Photos 2013-trip
Panoramic photos 2013-trip

2014 trip

M’goun mountain range (Morocco)

Photos
Panoramic photos

Northern part of the Annapurna Circuit (Nepal)

Photos
Panoramic photos

Full Annapurna Circuit (Syange-Ghorepani (Poon Hill))

Photos

 

Tour Muverans (Swiss Alps)

Wildstrubel region (Swiss Alps)

Kandersteg region (Swiss Alps)

Tour du Ruan

Disclaimer: the usual legal mumba jumbo: I try to give correct information … blablabla … however errors remain possible … blablabla … not my fault!
Also bear in mind English is not my mother tongue. 

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